Tag Archives: Manga

Mixed Media

I am a completion-ist at heart. If I’m collecting something, watching something, reading something, I want it all.

I don’t mean every obscure fan-fiction Star Trek story, or every piece of Babylon 5 paraphernalia available. But if I’m reading a series, I want every book in that series.

And here lies the quandary, do I mix my media?

I tend to split things this way: physical books (especially comic books) are for my really prized series. The best of the best. The rest is digital. But it’s the digital I actually have  time to read, so some of my “best of the best” series are actually all digital (Chew for example).

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Then there’s the stuff in the middle. I like to read Bleach (a manga). I own volumes 1-34 physically, but know that I do not have the shelf space to buy any more (the series is up in the 70’s now). Digital volumes of the series are actually half the price of the physical, and take up no more space than their electrons. And they’re way more likely to be read. But I’ll never make enough money from selling 1-34 to buy their digital equivalents (maybe a good number but not all), so selling my existing stock doesn’t make much sense. But I’m much more likely to actually read these books if I buy them digitally, and I buy a whole row of a shelf’s worth of space in the process.

So for the moment I have mixed media (1-34 physically and I just bought Volume 35 digitally). At least it’s a clean split.

But sometimes price can get the better of you.

If you’ve been reading a series on the Kindle, then suddenly find the next book as a paperback for 1/5th the price, do you go for it? Or do you buy the Kindle book anyway so you can have the whole series in one form?

Kindle Matchbook is a nice theoretical solution to this problem, except that you have to buy the books from Amazon, and not everything participates in that program (in fact most things don’t, Bleach doesn’t). What’d be nice is to be able to buy cheap digital copies of everything we own physically, regardless of how we got it, but that’s an impractical business model.

I don’t like buying things twice any more than the rest of us, but the urge to be able to take things with me is strong.

Maybe this is why libraries are awesome. You can read things without the burden of figuring out how to own them.

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Review: Henshin

Henshin

Writer and Artist – Ken Nimura

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Henshin is a collection of loosely connected short manga tales dealing with a sort of change. In reality few of the stories rise to the overriding theme of the book, and many are downright awful.

Three of the stories revolve around the author surrogate’s obsession with cats and his desire to own one. He leaves out food for a mysterious neighbor cat, and is rewarded with knocked over pots and deposits of kitty poop. In one tale the taste of a stew he is preparing is improved by these deposits, turning it into a curry. There’s some attempt to relate this improvement to the coffee beans that go through civets, but personally I think this is just gross. Fart monsters as superheroes are also apparently a thing, though the ending to that story was at least funny.

A tale in which a man is delighted that he is able to communicate with a French person to obtain a hammer is ruined by the “twist” ending. The author seems to favor the dark or sinister forces ending in a lot of these tales. A tale about summer watermelon ends with a moral that suicide is something you should do alone. The aforementioned hammer tale ends with a man being beaten to death. And the bookend stories about a troubled kid staying with her uncle throw in mysterious Yakuza elements (in fluffy suits) with little explanation. A manic-pixie-dream-girl story is ruined by the main character’s crass jokes, inability to consume alcohol, and concluding moral that he should drink in the middle of work.

All that said, there are a couple of stories I liked. The story in which the author bikes through his town in order to string together narratives is actually pretty good, especially when he repeatedly comes up with concepts for stories already written. There’s a cute wordless tale about a girl enjoying the best things of summer even in the dead of winter. And a drunken crass tale of two men commiserating over a divorce, ends with a lifelong tale of friendship and baseball. A tale about foreigners living in Japan is imaginative and amusing when frustration manifests as twenty foot monsters.

The artwork varies from tale to tale, but all of it has a rough sketchy quality. Some character expressions are almost indecipherable (I swear an editor character looked like a cyclops).

All in all, you might find a story or two you like in here, but it’s probably not worth wading through all the muck.

(2.5 Stars | A couple of nice tales toward the end, but mostly forgettable)

* I received a free ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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Morning Manga Madness

For today’s reviews we’ve got some great indie manga (and a manga inspired web-comic). The material here runs the gamut from manga short stories about the nature of life, to a fantasy involving a girl who fell from the sky (or what’d be like to be the wife of a God). Oh, and talking fishes.

Alive

Writer and Artist – Hajime Taguchi

AliveThe people in Alive often aren’t living, at least not well. From a girl who puts on a pair of glasses that hides everything she hates in the world, only to find that she can’t see anymore, to the woman who feels and is, trapped. The author captures the loneliness of relationships, and sex in particular, quite well, but it’s the fantasy pieces that I think are more worth the effort.

Like a lot of short story collections there are going to be some stories that resonate with you, and others that are mostly forgettable. The two best stories are probably “The Wall” and “The Tower” (Neither of these is the official title, some have them, some don’t but you’ll know the ones I’m talking about).

The first (The Wall) involves a young boy’s quest to climb an insurmountable wall around the world. No one who has ever climbed the wall has come back or lived to tell the tale, including the young boy’s father. This is a simple fable about how the pursuit of a dream can change our perceptions of the world, and how what we think is the end of the journey is often the beginning.

The second notable story is The Tower. A young man who isn’t doing too well at school or at life in general encounters a girl living at the top of their apartment building on a small roof barely the size of my home office. For a few magical days they live above the world in a virtual paradise before the limits of their home finally force them back to Earth. This story might suffer a bit from the fantasy pixie dream girl syndrome, but it’s made up for in its frank depiction of teenage emotions and how sometimes it can seem like such a great fantasy to give up the world.

The art varies. Because of the inconsistent titling and some stories having ambiguous or abrupt endings, it can be a little difficult to tell who is who or if we’ve switched stories. This is more a problem in the early part of the book (once you get used to the author’s beats you can usually pick up the changes). There’s definitely some experimentation with technique ranging from the mundane, an entire story from one perspective at a bar, to more fantastical pieces.

This is not really a very happy book, but there are a few pieces to make you smile, and maybe even a few you can relate to. Fair warning, there is a decent amount of nudity in the middle of this book, and some sexual behaviors you might be uncomfortable with.

(3 Stars | Uneven, but a couple of great stories)

Stones of Power

Writer and Artist – Azumi Isora

StonesOfPowerA young tropical fish expert gets drawn into the mysterious Cafe Renard which sells protective stones that can ward off evil spirits. And they have a couple of fish who have started to talk to him in his dreams. Are they just fish or are they gods who can control the rain and have control over the most powerful of old stones?

This is a pretty straightforward supernatural fantasy story with some amusing elements thrown in when communicating with the fish, and exploring the owner and his sister’s past. As a one off this story leaves a little lacking in terms of development, but as the first volume in what is hopefully a longer series, it is a great kicking off point.

Probably my favorite parts are the analogues between how the man takes care of the fish and their offspring, while at the same time communicating to them in his dreams. And we do have your typical “some things are best left undisturbed” and “you may be a chosen one” kind of tropes here, but that’s kind of to be expected.

The exact nature of the owner and why he’s chosen to ply his trade on a small scale is interesting, and we get a hint of a larger and darker past about which we might learn more in the future.

A good start to a story that could have some legs if the author wants to keep going.

(4 stars | You’ll like this one)

Give to the Heart – Volume 1

Writer and Artist  – Wann

GiveToTheHeartIn a devastated future world there are three demons who live as God among men, controlling the essential elements of life. The most powerful of these is the water king, who can save or drown a nation with little effort. We meet a young woman, Sooyi, who is running from the water king and trying to find a way into the dead city to find an artifact to finally kill the man who destroyed her world, the man who she once loved and who jealously wants to keep her as his wife.

Most of this first volume is focused on the relationship between Sooyi and The Water King. There’s a real thread of dominance here that can go from strong and maybe charming, to downright creepy after a while. While the King restrains himself from just taking Sooyi, it’s clear that he considers it an option. And Sooyi’s ultimate method of escape from the fortress in which he holds her is not without physical or emotional consequences.

Maybe I just take this stuff too seriously. Maybe to someone else this stuff is romantic, but to me he definitely seems like the kind of guy who we’ll be glad if Sooyi ever finds a way to kill him. There’s definitely a focus on effeminate male strength (again possibly a bearded man’s bias). Still a better love story than Twilight, but maybe not by much. Personally I hope Sooyi finds that artifact seeker geeky fellow from the beginning and they have a go at the Dead City. Guess we’ll see in Volume 2.

(3 Stars | A lot of romances are kind of creepy when you think about it)

Makeshift Miracle (Book 2)

Writer – Jim Zub, Artist – Shun Hong Chan

MakeshiftMiracleIf you’re worried about missing out on Book One, or about the slightly steep price-tag for a little over 100 page book, then you’re in luck, since the entire Makeshift Miracle story is available as a webcomic. Actually this version of Makeshift Miracle is a retelling of a web-comic Zub created in the early 2000’s with different artwork.

In the first volume Colby is a teenager who feels disconnected from life and is wandering outside the city when a girl named Iris falls from the sky. They get caught out in a storm, and somehow she is able to teleport them back to his house just by thinking of it. Then there’s a mysterious tree that crops up in the living room, Colby falls into a magical world, and Iris fades away.

In the second half Colby reconnects with Iris in the dream realm, running through the discarded pieces of dreams to try to protect Iris from those who are hunting her down. But the dream world exacts a terrible price on those who ask something of it, and the creatures that serve this world are not all as they appear.

There are so many pages of this that would make great posters for your room, or wallpapers for your computer. The artwork is amazing and evocative. Of particular note are the sky-ships over the desert, the final couple of pages parallels to the first volume, the last page, and the use of grays in lonely moments when color is only around the character. There’s a decent amount of humor, and the ending will definitely surprise you, so I don’t want to give too much away.

The price is a little steep for half the story (I think you could collect the whole run in a single volume for maybe $25 at the most), but having seen the first book out in the wild this is a high quality printing. If you’re not sure, read it online.

(5 stars | Can’t stress enough how great some of these pages are)

~4 down, maybe 20 to go 🙂

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Friday Reviews: Review Till You Drop Edition

Okay, I’m sorry I missed Thursday’s post. I was tired and my bed was  inviting, the single most dastardly obstacle to any writer. However, since I am on my own this evening I thought I’d try a little marathon reviewing. I’m going to review as many books and comic books in a single post until my computer loses charge, my fingers fall off, I run out of things I’ve read, or my wife comes home.

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The Mercenary Sea – Volume 1

Writer – Kel Symons, Artist – Mathew Reynolds

DIG027519_2On the eve of war a group of misfits and outcasts sail aboard the stolen German U-boat, the Venture, in search of adventure, treasure and a home. Everyone aboard has a past they are running away from, some with adversaries trying to catch up. The crew is hired to rescue a British intelligence operative from behind enemy lines in order to bring vital intelligence home that could change the course of the looming world war.

This is a good pulp story, particularly after you wade through the lengthy intro. The leader of this band, Captain Jack Harper (isn’t it always Jack?), comes off as a macho stone-faced type a first, but softens with a devilish sense of humor, and a penchant for the fantastical in the form of his search for a legendary lost treasure. There’s a lot of potential for more adventures with this crew if you can get past one glaring detail.

The artwork.

The artwork is flat, colored in matte solid colors with facial expressions that look like they could have been programmed into a computer. Think flash animation. It’s clear from the sketchbook section of this volume that the artist is capable of much more realistic and compelling detail. Whether this was a decision on the part of the colorer to give it a more nostalgic, almost poster-like look, or whether it was the main artist themselves the effect is to make the book look more childish than it is. Sure it’s a pulp action story, but this kind of work should have been reserved for the covers or maybe a couple of stills. Some scenery shots, like the one shown here on the cover, have more depth of field and even some compelling detail, but on the whole this looks unprofessional.

Still, I’d be willing to hire the Venture for another voyage if nothing else for an Indiana Jones like ride under the seas.

(3 Stars | Rounding down from 3.5, the art really is that bad)

Coffee Gives Me Superpowers

Writer – Ryoko Iwata

cover60866-mediumThis book is largely a series of info-graphics about everybody’s favorite beverage, addiction, obsession, coffee. I was surprised to learn that engineers do not drink the most coffee, though a lot of scientific professionals and writers do. I have definitely applied the principles of when to drink beer and when to drink coffee, and I’m pleased to know that the bumble bee enjoys the “buzz” from coffee as much as I do (their pun not mine).

This would make a better coffee table book than an ebook. You could probably devour this in one coffee break, especially if you’re sipping a Venti. Some graphics are just cleverly displayed stats, but I actually appreciated the graphic showing the differences between a cappuccino, a latte, etc. I don’t tend to drink these things (tried a flat white a little while ago and it just struck me as frothy, expensive coffee that tasted more bitter than black. But I might try variants of the red-eye (shot of espresso in your coffee). I wonder if I can coin the term purple eye to mean four shots?

Also McDonald’s coffee is apparently the weakest in terms of caffeine content. And if you ever watched the episode of Futurama where Fry tries to drink 100 cups of coffee, you might want to know he’d probably die of caffeine poisoning about 20 shy of his goal.

(4 stars | Good, maybe a little short)

Henni

Writer and Artist – Miss Lasko-Gross

DIG050249_2Henni is a coming-of-age story about a girl who questions the wisdom of a society that teaches that she should not learn, that her husband should be chosen for her by bribing a priest, and that she would die if she went outside the confines of her village. Her father went missing many years ago and soon Henni discovers that her father made it outside and that the world is far larger and stranger than she might have imagined. But that doesn’t mean it is necessarily better, at least not in all corners.

I liked this, and think it would be a great story for someone to read at about age 8-10. It’s enchantingly illustrated mostly in black and white with blue tones (as you can see from the cover). The dialogue is simple and straightforward but not childish, though it does occasionally descend into childish humor.

I particularly enjoyed the sequence where Henni is being trained in the ways of the new world and how their creation myth stacks up with what she’s been taught. Her own interpretation of the story may be closer to the mark than the people in this new city would want to admit.

The story ends a bit abruptly. Part of me wanted to find some more sign of her father, or to find a place that she could be accepted, but we are led to conclude this is eventually what happened. It may be that I just was hoping we could spend a little more time in this world.

(4 stars | Give this one to a daughter or son you love)

VS Aliens

Writer and Artist  – Yu Suzuki

cover55975-mediumKitaro is confronted by his classmate Aya with a startling claim, their fellow classmate Sana is an alien. To make matters more complicated Sana believes she may be an alien and that someone is out to capture her, or take her back to her home planet. Is Sana really an alien, or is there something more dark and sinister behind all of this?

This is one of the more engaging stories I’ve read from Gen Manga. The first couple of chapters of this story are in the Gen Samplers available on Amazon, but with the Kindle edition selling currently for $2.99 you really can’t go wrong with just buying this one. Most Manga volumes are at least $5.99 which is still cheaper than most American graphic novels.

The one thing I like about teen comedies from Japan, is that they tend to come without a lot of the angst that shows up in American stories. Sure there’s a little bit of hurt feelings or awkwardness in sharing a jacket, but the majority of the story is focused on fun and intrigue. The final reveal is equal parts entertaining as it is implausible. Ah, the lengths we’ll go for true love.

The art style is similar to other titles of this type, like Love Hina (you know I never did actually get to their wedding at the end of that., but I’m not sure I want to start back over from volume 1 just to remember what I read five years ago). In this case this volume is a “one and done”, like most of the Gen Manga volumes I’ve read, so it’s a great way to read a fun story without a whole lot of commitment.

(5 stars | Maybe 4.5, but worth the rounding up. Seriously, give this one a try.)

Yeah, the little red haired girl is home early. I think we can call a double post pretty good!

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Friday Reviews: Forgotten Memories and Mysterious Pasts

Each Friday I’ll be reviewing a couple of books (usually comic books from Net Galley). This week is our first Manga week of the year with a couple of titles that explore robots with personality and people with the personality of robots.

Android Angels

Writer and Artist – Kosuke Kabaya

AndroidAngelsIn the world of Android Angels, domestic robots are available for the public but can only be leased for a period of four years before having their memories wiped. This, ostensibly, is to prevent the attachment of people to machines rather than human beings. Still the androids are able to retain any abilities they may have gained from previous owners, and there is some sense that they retain a latent sense of memory as well.

This is an anthology of shorter manga stories with some loose connections, mainly a couple of pages featuring a character from a previous story. The first shows a young student and her robot butler who in a past life was some kind of military droid with bad people still out to get him. Another deals with cooking and the sexual properties of pomegranates. A third takes us into the home of an android developer testing out new designs with only a one month period of getting to know the machine and the last deals with an owner who isn’t quite read to give up his relationship with his android.

Most of the stories deal with the kind of relationships people form with their machines and not as much with the implications wiping memory might have on personality and sentience. Androids in this universe have some sense of their status as lesser servants and that should not form relationships directly with humans, but at the same time come to care for them. Some even express desires of their own. From a science fiction and romantic perspective we cover a lot more ground here than the first arcs of Alex + Ada (from the Luna brothers).

Art is good and done in a more comic style. Not a lot is done to explore the setting of these stories, or the reasons why humanity is now living as it is. As with most anthologies some stories are better than others, but the recurring themes are intriguing, and the stories give us some small emotional or family humor moments. Some of the humor may be less accessible to an American audience, but I’ve always liked the cultural idiosyncrasies of humor.

Probably one of the better things I’ve read out of Gen Manga, which as an independent Manga publisher has so far been a little uneven for me.

(4 Stars | Probably more like 3.5, but still worth the read)

Good-bye Geist

Writer – Ryo Hanada

600167-goodbye_geist_largeA young student is harassed on her commute. At the same time she finds out another student has been filming her. What’s the connection between these events and a series of violent acts on animals from seven years ago? Who can be trusted, and who might be a source of new feelings to be explored?

This had some interesting ideas, but kind of fell down in the execution. For starters some of the characters look very similar in appearance and are difficult to distinguish. It can also be difficult to determine the gender of some characters initially, adding to the confusion as to what exactly is going on.

The story itself feels disjointed and never really draws to much a conclusion. We’re led to believe that what’s going on now is connected to a series of cat mutilations and an eventual murder from seven years ago but why these events are playing out again now is never really explained. We’re also left not sure if our main character is making the best choices for herself and whether she is accepting that the world can do some terrible things or whether she is fighting back.

Given the confusion of the plot, the tacked on short story at the end is confusing in part because you’re not sure at first if we’re meant to think it has anything to do with the plot. It describes a particular conversation between two people on the eve of graduation and again given how indecipherable the author’s art is we’re not sure if these are our characters a few years later or a flashback to previous events.

This had the bones of an intriguing mystery and exploration of teenage feelings but needed work in the execution.

(2 Stars | Rounding down from around 2.5. I kept reading to see if it made any sense but it never really did.)

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Manga Madness

Well, I’ve been meaning to write this post for a couple of weeks now, and finally have a good morning to sit down and do it. As I’m typing my fingers are being gently massaged by my vibrating keyboard as my laptop does burns. Again, these are all books I received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review, including Pride and Prejudice which I actually had to request (more on that later).

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Anomalby Nukuharu

51uYmefdybLThis is actually a collection of stories from indie Japanese Authors, published by Gen Manga Entertainment. The cover story is so-so, featuring a man with a hundred eyes all over his body helping a man to see, but then holding that gift over him. “You know those eyes I gave you? Pretty great huh?” We’ve got a detective who solves crimes by reenacting the actions of the murderer and victim with his male partner (so if you like a little yaoi action there you go). The later stories are more interesting, in part because they stray into weirder territory that seems very distinctly Japanese.

Next is a man falling in love with a demon (yokai), who he’s known since childhood. She mainly loves for him for the delicious spells he utters, and even gives him the chance to turn back the clock when he is nearly killed by demon spirits, to live his life again happier. But my personal favorite of the collection is the girl who wants to hug demons (even if they don’t want to be hugged). To accomplish this goal she tries to become head of the demons with the help of her guide, who also happens to be her schoolmate. In this case the demons possess a human carrier, and manifest by being vaguely ghostly creatures with cute pig eyes, a jagged mouth, and little horns. What’s not to love?

The translation on a few of these might be a little rushed, and admittedly none of this is top-grade material. But the art is excellent and varied between the different authors, and the dialog is punchy in spots. There’s probably something for everyone to love in this collection. Most of the stories have a pretty light touch, so don’t expect horror in the traditional sense as you might have assumed from the product description. (4 out 0f 5)

Outlaws of the Marsh (Volume 1)by Wei Dong Chen

51TAHRbPsBLThis is a manga adaptation of an ancient Chinese epic (which is sometimes also known as the Water Margin). This is an epic in every sense of the word (the Amazon copy of one of the more well-known translations of this story is 2008 pages, the sample alone feels like a book). 108 spirits are let out into the world and must be defeated.

The main story revolves around Jin Shi, as he goes from being a brash young man to a trained and disciplined fighter. There have been many inspired manga adaptations of this story, including Outlaw Star (a sci-fi Anime in the vein of Cowboy Bebop). This title does not live up to some of the other works in this genre. It is clearly aimed at children, and the dialogue is painful. Just about every awful foreign film trope is in here. Presumably the original is in better shape, though it’s hard to tell.

The artwork is blurry and again looks like something out of a child’s picture book. Even in the action sequences, you get little sense of the motion of the characters, and their expressions rarely vary. The main benefit to this story is making me aware of the longer epic which I might read some year when I have the time. (2 out of 5)

Pride and Prejudiceadaption by Stacey King

815KJlGdCKLI’m giving this book three stars, which if anybody knows me is like someone else giving it five. I’m not particularly a fan of Jane Austen’s work, but as is the case with a lot of NetGalley stuff, this seemed too weird to pass up.

The artwork is more in the style of Revolutionary Girl Utena, with pointed chins and sour expressions, though I swear the father is cribbed from the dad in Fullmetal Alchemist. The adaptation is pretty straightforward, with bits of humor in tipping the mother into full anime stereotype, with stars for eyes as she dreams of marrying off her daughters into money. The book proceeds in chapters which I assume correspond roughly to the chapters in the novel (though I’ll admit I didn’t pick it up to verify).

Probably the best bits are the little four panels comics in between chapters, that adapt more humorous or speculative scenes from the book. Even as I found myself wondering what the hell any of these people would want to do with each other, these comics gave me a chuckle. Again, if I was going to read Pride and Prejudice, this would be the way to do it. (3 out of 5)

Kamen (Volume 1) – by Gunya Mihara

81W48sIDyrLI actually caught a snippet of this in the Gen Manga collections sold on Amazon and had been intrigued, so I was pleased when I saw this on NetGalley. A man wakes up wearing a talking mask. If he takes it off, he will die, and because it is covering his mouth, he cannot speak. Throughout the whole volume, we learn only about the man through his actions, and the commentary of the mask which can sometimes be kind of funny.

The man is captured and brought into servitude in a castle under siege. The female leader of this group has challenged an outside opponent because of their corrupt ways and now faces the potential annihilation of her people, all while dealing with her uncle and his own political machinations. The masked man takes to protecting a young nearly dead girl and at one point fights off dozens of opponents while carrying her in one arm.

Much more of an action comic, this does fight sequences very well, and the design of the mask is intriguing and even vaguely familiar. I would suggest skipping to the back of the book for the character descriptions and some background information on the time period and geo-political situation. I found this a little confusing just from the information provided in the story. Overall, I’m interested to see where this is going, and was pleased to find Volume 2 now available on NetGalley as well. (4 out of 5)

 

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Amazon Manga Madness!!!

Long time readers of the blog may remember I like to read manga, but being an Amazon Kindle user my options were limited and they had none of my favorite series (including Bleach and most Viz media).

Apparently that has changed.

After a couple of layers of Amazon “you may like” or “customers who bought this item also bought”, I discovered Rurouni Kenshin – Restoration, a two volume retelling / tie-in with the live action movie (also discussed on this blog). Each volume is priced at $5.79 and are welcome editions to my Kindle (I’ll evaluate the story and the movie in a future post once the live action arrives on my doorstep).

It turns out Amazon has a lot of good titles: Naruto, Bleach, Attack on Titan, Rurouni Kenshin and Neon Genesis Evangelion. Single volumes all seem to be priced at around the $5.79 price though the Evangelion title’s offer three-in-ones priced at $9.39. Absent though is Fullmetal Alchemist, Trigun, Love Hina and numerous others that I would have loved to see.

As I have long suspected it would, manga looks great on the Touch. Barnes and Noble, who used to be the only game in town, did not offer manga on their eReaders, only supporting it on their tablet models. There are some quirks, however:

  • Manga is compatible with my Touch but not my first generation Fire. This seems odd since the Fire has a better resolution and supports a variety of other comics. It works on my crappy generic Android, however. To my understanding the Touch and the Fire are the same hardware generation so I find it a little odd that the Touch works and Fire does not.
  • The manga pages are ordered backwards, or more to the point they are placed back to front as a real printed volume would be. I think it’s a little weird to have to hit the previous button to get the next page, and the effect is not as natural as it is with the actual book.

The price point’s not bad, though I wish they offered more of the long running series in the same format as the Evangelion books (the equivalent of buying each volume for $3.13 instead of $5.79). Kenshin is a 28 volume series, and Bleach and Naruto have 50+ volumes. Manga has never been the cheapest hobby to sustain, and Amazon is cheaper than most print runs, but it’s still expensive to have a complete collection.

Overall I’m happy, particularly for trying new series like Attack on Titan that I haven’t read. One of these days I’ll have to review a real book so you don’t think all I read is comic books 🙂

What other manga titles do you like?

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